684 Women A Day

684 WOMEN PER DAY ARE DIAGNOSED WITH OVARIAN CANCER
This is not a feel good article...

Unbelievable, just think of this 75% of these women will not live past 5 years, that is 513 women. I'm having a problem writing this as these figures are astonishing. 24,966 women per year diagnosed with Ovarian Cancer. With a mortality rate at 75%.

It's time to educate, get the word out, help women become their own advocate. Let's catch this disease in the early stages where we can read more survivor stories, not obituaries.

This (and any type of cancer) doesn’t just affect one person, it affects the entire family and close friends, our childhood best friends, we all suffer.

Cancer is wide spread, asking for an end to cancer is wonderful, that's just not as realistic as we would want it to be. But early detection is within our reach. Get all of the information you can, and it's free. The CDC and National Cancer organizations will happily donate information, brochures anything you might need if you are ready to start the fight.

I started my own foundation which is literally a grass roots organization with that one goal I'm sure you have, help others as you were helped. Reach out into the community and you will be surprised at the response you'll get. Find a hospital that has a research center, join forces with them. I reached out to Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles, we have been partners for 3 years now. If I could do it so can you.

Contact me for more info at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Sincerely,
Sharon

Or Donate Monthly
Did you like this article?
Help us to keep locating and providing the information you want to read. Donate today.
Donate $5 one time | Donate $10 one time | Donate $15 one time


Like our Facebook page. Everyday we post the most recent breakthroughs and human interest stories on Ovarian Cancer.




10 genes

Want to stay informed on the up-to-date info on Ovarian Cancer?

Like our Facebook page. Everyday we post the most recent breakthroughs and human interest stories on Ovarian Cancer.


Guest Report from Jacqueline Vitti Frederick
March 10th, 2014

This study was done at the hospital where my daughter was treated for ovarian cancer. This is why we need to continue to fundraise and support ongoing research. It will save lives.

Kathy Boltz, PhD
December 23, 2013
Genetic biomarker for ovarian cancer deepens knowledge of survival outcomes

A series of 10 genes have been identified that may signify a trifecta of benefits for women with ovarian cancer. This 10-gene biomarker panel may identify the aggressiveness of a patient's disease, help predict survival outcomes, and result in novel therapeutic strategies tailored to patients with the most adverse survival outcomes.

When a patient's tumor is identified as having elevated levels of these 10 specific genes, doctors may be able to better predict which treatments would be most effective, said Dong-Joo (Ellen) Cheon, PhD, of the Women's Cancer Program at Cedars-Sinai's Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute in Los Angeles, California. The research was published in Clinical Cancer Research (2013; doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-13-1256).

That is an important advance because ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic cancer and is often diagnosed in later, more aggressive stages, resulting in poor prognosis and survival. These outcomes differ due to development of tumors that become resistant to chemotherapy. By identifying chemo-resistant tumors and identifying the risk of poor survival outcomes during the diagnostic process, investigators hope to extend lives and improve treatment responses for women with ovarian cancer.

"The ultimate goal is to use the 10-gene biomarker panel to develop a diagnostic kit that will identify patients with the most adverse outcome and provide targeted therapeutic strategies," said Cheon. "Among the biomarkers identified, the gene COL11A1 was shown to be the most abundantly expressed in ovarian cancer progression. But when we blocked expression of COL11A1 in murine cancer cells, tumor growth and spread was significantly reduced."

The 10-gene biomarker panel revealed another promising benefit. The 10 genes associated with the panel all share one common biological process—the formation of a collagen matrix around cancerous cells. This thick, collagen-rich matrix can protect cancer cells from the lethal effect of chemotherapy and serve as an incubator for increasingly aggressive cancer cells. Understanding how this collagen-rich environment may contribute to aggressive tumor cell behavior may ultimately lead to more efficient therapies.

"This data, based on the analysis of nearly 800 ovarian cancer patients, suggests that patients who have elevated levels of genes associated with the biomarker panel have shorter survival and more aggressive forms of disease," said Sandra Orsulic, PhD, senior author of this study, and director of women's cancer biology in the Women's Cancer Program, and associate professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. "These findings indicate that, even though patients present with the same disease stage at diagnosis, their survival outcomes differ."

The findings suggest that the 10-gene signature may have both predictive value and biological relevance that may be useful in treating patients.

Or Donate Monthly
Did you like this article?
Help us to keep locating and providing the information you want to read. Donate today.
Donate $5 one time | Donate $10 one time | Donate $15 one time


Like our Facebook page. Everyday we post the most recent breakthroughs and human interest stories on Ovarian Cancer.


Julie

Want to stay informed on the up-to-date info on Ovarian Cancer?

Like our Facebook page. Everyday we post the most recent breakthroughs and human interest stories on Ovarian Cancer.


Julie
March 6th, 2014

I had just formed the Sharon Leigh Ovarian cancer foundation, I wasn't sure where I was going to go with it, I only knew I wanted to help women, in the same manner I was helped.

After sharing with a friend over lunch one day we decided a golf tournament sounded pretty simple and a good way of raising the necessary funds for research.

Now there was the beginning of a serious learning curve for me as it isn't simple to put on a golf tournament, its a lot of hard work.

I live in a relatively small county, because of my ignorance I didn't realize that small counties were very committed to supporting the county and no others, regardless of the fact that research was helping women from all over the world. The monies raised were in fact being directed to Los Angeles, Cedars-Sinai research center.

I was told (in a way that was meant to be helpful) that the tournament would most likely fail. Well, I have my faith in God not man so I continued on in blind faith.

Driving home from Arizona one day I received a phone call from a woman who said "My name is Julie, I am an ovarian cancer survivor, I heard about your foundation and would like to attend a meeting" of course, I said yes and "bring your husband".

She, without knowing it, was the answer to my prayers. Julie and her husband Gary are in the agriculture business, a very liked and respected couple.

They became a vital part of our foundation, with their contacts throughout the entire state of California, we had, from the very first golf tournament to the present, very successful tournaments. The change of tide was that all of the players were not from my county, it was not a concern to them where the money went only that it would hopefully help Julie and others like her.

I'm sharing this with you because Julie's cancer came back recently, after almost four years of being so close to the five year mark we so look forward to, she is back in the fight again.

Julie is a fighter, with a lot of prayer and family support she will win this battle again.

Never give up hope, many of us have had this recurring cancer.

On a side note I spoke with the family of a woman who recently finished her latest bout with OC, the third time for her. Her pet scan indicated no cancer cells!!

Again I say never give up hope! Keep praying.

In Jesus,
Sharon Leigh

Or Donate Monthly
Did you like this article?
Help us to keep locating and providing the information you want to read. Donate today.
Donate $5 one time | Donate $10 one time | Donate $15 one time


Like our Facebook page. Everyday we post the most recent breakthroughs and human interest stories on Ovarian Cancer.




Her name is Emma

Want to stay informed on the up-to-date info on Ovarian Cancer?

Like our Facebook page. Everyday we post the most recent breakthroughs and human interest stories on Ovarian Cancer.


Her name is Emma
March 4th, 2014

God works in mysterious ways, you've heard that before..well it's true!

I recently read about Emma who weighed about 308 lbs. All of her life she was obese, diets didn't work for her, she stated the weight just came back.

She then decided to have surgery, a gastric bypass, financial complications showed their faces as always.

Emma chose to fly to the Czech Republic for the surgery, there a tumor on her left ovary was discovered. Like all of us Emma was in shock, she didn't feel sick. Sounds familiar doesn't it?

The gastric bypass was postponed, Emma flew back to England for emergency surgery. A 17 cm tumor was found on her left ovary. The tumor was successfully removed, a hysterectomy was necessary. She is in great health today.

Emma's life was saved by her obesity, if you want to read more on Emma click on this link.

For some of us this is very mysterious, Our God does work in ways we least expect. In fact the one thing you can count on is this, His way is just about always what we've least expected. Just keep trusting, His love for us is endless.

In Jesus,
Sharon Leigh



Victim

Want to stay informed on the up-to-date info on Ovarian Cancer?

Like our Facebook page. Everyday we post the most recent breakthroughs and human interest stories on Ovarian Cancer.


Have you ever been hit by a car?
February 20th, 2014

Have you ever been hit by a car that ran a red light, or while riding your bicycle, or how about slip sliding on an icy road then into a ditch?

That would make you a victim of some freak accident you weren't prepared for right?

That's exactly how you feel when told you have ovarian cancer, you're an innocent victim. You weren't driving a car or bicycle, but you do feel like you've been side-swiped or thrown off of life's daily routine and ended up in a ditch.

Now your fighting for your life, and you didn't even leave the house, so we wonder, did I create this monster? Was I eating the wrong foods, or maybe I should have joined the gym, or to much wine?

The answer is No you are a victim!

What's next is finding an oncologist, your gynecologist should be able to recommend one for you, he'll want to know all about your family history, make a list before you go in for your first visit with him or her.

Family history is vital in finding the chemotherapy that will best fight the type of cancer you have. Always remember that our parents genes are what made us who we are today, did your dad or anyone in his family have any cancer history? This applies to moms side of the family also.

Old school thinking was that ovarian cancer was only on the woman's side of the bar, today we know it's from the entire balance bar. Sort of a scale of justice, (without any justice for us) both equally involved in creating our genetic makeup.

Be prepared, you are in for the heavyweight champion fight of your life. This cannot be sugar-coated with some light comments, it's a battle, but you can do it.

You have strength that probably so far has not been tapped into. Our Lord has given you the strength you need, He has known all along this was going to happen to you, just start trusting in Him. That is exactly how I got through my cancer treatments and at that same time the loss of my husband.

Email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., I'm interested in how you are coping with cancer. Send a picture with your story, I'll post it on my website.

In Jesus,
Sharon Leigh

Or Donate Monthly
Did you like this article?
Help us to keep locating and providing the information you want to read. Donate today.
Donate $5 one time | Donate $10 one time | Donate $15 one time


Like our Facebook page. Everyday we post the most recent breakthroughs and human interest stories on Ovarian Cancer.




One Man's Story

One Man's Story
October 13th, 2012

We thought this was a good story about one of the effects of Ovarian Cancer. This man's story is one many men can relate to. Here is a quote from the story from Newstimes.com:

"Geoff Herald held his head in his hands and talked to the table. "She had so much cancer in her," said Danbury's decorated fire chief, the man with the suddenly trembling voice. "The doctors gave her an 8 percent chance of living out the year."

This wasn't the Lizzie who wrapped her arms around Herald for 3,400 miles on his Suzuki 850 for their honeymoon. This wasn't the Lizzie who twirled like a pinwheel in her Middle Eastern dance costume. This Lizzie was barely strong enough to breathe at Danbury Hospital. And yet, even as the fluid spilled into her lungs, she somehow managed to tell everyone she could how much she loved them.

And the whispers -- these drawn-out, deliberate gifts crossing her lips -- told you she meant it. Lizzie (Kunic) Tapester died Oct. 2 after a 16-month battle with ovarian cancer. She was just 50 years old."

You can read the rest of the story here.

Sincerely
Sharon Leigh



Monday, July 16, 2018
English Facebook Spanish Facebook Group English Facebook Group Twitter Ovarian Cancer Google+

Want to stay informed?

Up-to-date info on Ovarian Cancer

Like our Facebook page. Everyday we post the most recent breakthroughs and human interest stories on Ovarian Cancer.

Ovarian Cancer

This year in America Ovarian cancer will strike an estimated 25,500 women, and kill more than 14,000! Ovarian cancer remains the deadliest gynecologic malignancy and the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths among women in the United States.

What’s the problem? There is no early detector for Ovarian Cancer!

It’s been 25 years since a test for ovarian cancer was introduced to help diagnose this disease.
Should this get your attention, YES!
Should you do something about it? Yes!

I sailed along in life eating well, working out regularly, I didn’t smoke, didn’t have a drinking problem, only the occasional glass of wine. When one day I was told you have cancer. I have what! Wake up Sharon you have ovarian cancer.

It was found in the first stage, why? the early detection exams listed below found my cancer. I grant this there was a history in my family as my sister died from ovarian cancer. My question has always been this, I was examined for eight years before this was found.

Why can’t these tests be used as a regular, early detection tool for the discovery. All of the reports indicate that there is not substantial evidence to back this up. I am not an MD I am just a person who wants to do something about women suffering and dying unnecessarily. These women are not the only ones suffering, their family members are with them every step of the journey.

1a blood test of the serum CA 125 level (CA 125 is a high level of protein in the body)

2 transvaginal ultrasonography (TVU)

3 a pelvic exam

There is a new biomarker ...that has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for making a diagnosis of Ovarian cancer but only for monitoring the recurrence and progression of epithelial ovarian cancer. HE4 it will improve the ability to properly treat women in whom ovarian cancer has been diagnosed. The hope is it will be used in the future for an actual early detection in conjunction with the CA 125 serum.

Lets hope and pray that soon there will be the early detection break through we have been waiting for and end this nightmare.

Help End Ovarian Cancer

Update Notifications

Get an email when we update our website!

Twitter Feed

2 Minute Survey

Please take 2 minutes to fill out this form. Our printable version is here.
Check the box if you are currently experiencing any of these symptoms:

 

Medicine Net OC Quiz

How much do you know about Ovarian Cancer?

Take this quiz and find out.

Don't forget to take our 2 minute survey also!